Our journey continues….

So our potential buyer has been to the website, they’ve seen the photos of the house, and now they’re reading the description. The property description is just as important as the photos and unfortunately, investors seem to always hurry through their description. Often times you’ll see a description such as this (IN ALL CAPS OF COURSE):

“TOTALLY REMODELED START TO FINISH – GUTTED AND REPLACED, EVERYTHING NEW.” In other words, it used to be a crappy, unoccupied house with mold, mildew, and rodents as it’s primary tenants. I think a better way to interpret that description would be this:

“I AM A REAL ESTATE INVESTOR. I BOUGHT THIS ON THE CHEAP AS A FORECLOSURE. I THREW SOME PAINT ON THE WALLS AND SOME CARPET ON THE FLOORS. NOW I’M GOING TO SELL IT TO YOU AND MAKE A LOT OF MONEY!”

Before the deal has even been discussed, you have already done yourself (and your client) a disservice by devaluing the property in your shallow, bland description. Try to avoid using phrases such as “totally remodeled” or “everything new.” Stay clear of “new water heater” or “replaced furnace.” Look, buyers don’t really care about the water heaters, the furnace, or the hall closet. Buyers are like you and I…they watch all of the interior design and flipping shows on cable television. That’s what they want in their purchase.

Two things sell homes: kitchens and bathrooms – so use that to your advantage. Note that the kitchen has a certain brand and/or color granite countertop. (a Wow Factor) Note that the bathrooms have heated tile, another “Wow Factor,” especially in states with cold winters. Note the stainless steel appliances in the kitchen. Focus on your “Wow Factors” and the house will sell itself. Use terms like “special order tiles” or “custom granite.” We also like to use terms like “professional,” “special order,” “upgraded,” or “customized/custom,” etc.

As I mentioned in previous articles, we developed our own brand, AnnLeeInteriors.com and have reaped huge rewards because buyers and agents now know our brand. Rather than describing our house as a “totally remodeled inside and out” home, we like to stand-out by saying “another custom home brought to you by AnnLeeInteriors.com.” This gives your potential buyer a feeling that a professional interior design company came in and did it just like we see on television. Your customer wants what they see on TV, so use that to your advantage. Create your own brand!

You may ask, “why do you refer them to “AnnLeeInteriors.com” rather than just “Ann Lee Interiors?” We want the buyer to visit the website because it gives our interior design company a ton of credibility! It also shows them examples of other flips in which AnnLeeInteriors.com designs were used successfully.

I close with an example of one of our AnnLeeInteriors.com listing description:

This is a AnnLeeInteriors.com custom designed home. Upon entering the residence, you walk into a spacious living area with beautiful hardwood floors throughout.
The kitchen is gorgeous with stunning upgraded granite countertops, custom mosaic glass tile back splash, under mount cabinet lighting, brand new cabinetry with ample storage space, and sparkling stainless steel appliances.
The master suite is a HUGE oasis with a massive walk-in Martha Stewart closet. The master bath has a wonderful double vanity with plenty of counter space and storage. The shower is perfect with custom linen tile and gorgeous foil accent tile. This home has the best finishes!
You won’t want to miss out on this one! Come-on in, kick off your shoes, relax, and enjoy your new home today!

Hopefully, you’re already in the process of building your brand! Take this advice and in due course, you will reap huge benefits in your real estate investing business. Stand out from your competitors and start rehabbing your investments with your future CLIENTS in-mind! It works – I’m living proof. For more information on Ann Lee Interiors, visit www.annleeinteriors.com. To subscribe to our on-going educational blog series, please visit www.blog.andrewcordle.com and register on the right hand side of the page.

 

By Andrew Cordle AndrewCordle.com